Monthly Archives: December 2014

The Geneologies of the Monsters

It all began in 1931 with “Dracula.” This is regarded as a horror classic–although Universal hedged its bets by marketing it as “the strangest love story ever told.” In truth, an emblematic performance by Bela Lugosi keeps this film alive. … Continue reading

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My Problem with “Thunderball”

CAUTION: CONTAINS “SPOILERS” “Thunderball” was the first Bond movie that really let me down. I had been waiting for it since the summer when I oogled the barber shop copy of Esquire, featuring a multi-page preview of what promised to … Continue reading

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The Art of the Duel

All fans of swashbucklers are familiar with the work of Fred Cavens, whether they recognize the name or not. Cavens created a graceful, balletic style of fight choreography that resulted in the memorable duel on the staircase of Nottingham Castle … Continue reading

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The Runt of the Marlowe Litter

CAUTION: CONTAINS “SPOILERS” Over the years “The Brasher Doubloon” has gained the dubious honor of being regarded as the least of the four Philip Marlowe films, each produced by a different studio, in the 1940s. I’m not at all certain … Continue reading

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Let’s Talk Some More About Werewolves

I’ve always wondered, what “The Wolf Man” would have been like if the powers at Universal had honored Curt Siodmak’s original concept. He had apparently envisioned a psychological thriller in which the viewer would never know for sure whether Larry … Continue reading

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A Backwards Step?

I was twelve when I saw “Dr. No” and at that time, I thought that SPECTRE was a pretty cool idea. Of course William Everson had already pointed out in his wonderful book The Bad Guys that a world-wide criminal … Continue reading

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